St. Clair Township Crest
1155 Emily Street
Mooretown ON
N0N 1M0

Phone: (519) 867-2021
Email: webmaster@twp.stclair.on.ca

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Please click here for the results of the Community Survey that took place in July.

Please click here for the results of the Community Survey that took place in July.

ST. CLAIR TOWNSHIP 2020 COMMUNITY SURVEY
AUGUST 2020
FINAL REPORT

TABLE OF
CONTENTS

Key Findings 3 Conclusions/Recommendations 6 Methodology 8 Profile of Respondents 9 Overall Citizen Impressions 10 Core Services/Assets Assessment 14 Taxes and Municipal Spending Priorities 22 Communication and Service Assessment 28 Waste Collection 34

FOR MORE

Top Community Concerns

KEY FINDINGS

INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Curtis Brown
Principal

PROBE RESEARCH INC.
603-191 Lombard Ave. Winnipeg, MB R3B 0X1 (204) 894-3298
curtis@probe-research.com www.probe-research.com

St. Clair Township residents are presently most likely to be concerned about jobs and the state of the economy (15%) and COVID-19 (12%), with significant numbers of residents also saying the community’s top issues include flooding and high water levels (14%), the state of local roads (12%) and internet and cellphone service (10%).
Satisfaction With Township Services
Overall, nearly nine-in-ten St. Clair Township residents are satisfied with the services their municipality provides – including one-third who offer the Township top marks (6 on a 6-point satisfaction scale).
Residents are most likely to express satisfaction with household drinking water and garbage and recycling collection (89% satisfied for both). Although satisfaction is lowest for bridge maintenance and collecting/treating wastewater, these are the two services for which residents are most likely to be unable to offer a satisfaction rating.
Advanced statistical analysis shows that collecting and treating wastewater has a major relationship to whether residents are satisfied overall with Township services, with garbage and recycling collection and street/road maintenance being secondary drivers of overall satisfaction.
When plotted on a grid comparing the importance and satisfaction with services, the results show that the Township has two critical areas for improvement – wastewater and road maintenance. Garbage and recycling collection as well as household drinking water are areas where the Township is perceived to be doing relatively well, but these appear to be less important to residents.
When asked to recommend specific services that can be improved, one-quarter of residents advocate for improvements to local roads and their maintenance, with one- in-ten (including a higher share of Ward 2 residents) wanting improvements to parks
and recreation facilities. 3

KEY FINDINGS (CONT’D)

Value for Tax Dollars and Spending Priorities
Nearly three-quarters indicate they receive at least good value for the taxes they pay to the Township, including nearly one-quarter who feel they obtain excellent value.
One-in-five say they get fair value for their taxes, with just three per cent indicating
they receive poor value for what they pay in property taxes.
Residents are split down the middle regarding their preferences for municipal taxation and spending levels. Slightly less than one-half favour increasing taxes, with the bulk of these (42%) advocating for slight tax increases to maintain services at existing levels and a small proportion (6%) who would accept higher taxes to enhance services. Meanwhile, more than four-in-ten support decreasing service levels, with most (40%) preferring to maintain tax rates at their existing threshold and an additional five per cent advocating for both lower tax rates and steeper service decreases.
When residents were asked to rate spending priorities for core municipal assets and services (using a MaxDiff approach), the results show that residents feel spending more money on household drinking water is by far the top priority. Residents also place a high priority on street and road maintenance.

KEY FINDINGS (CONT’D)

Waste Collection
Residents are also split on the need for an automated roll cart system for household waste and recycling. Only about one-half of residents express support for adopting this system for both waste streams, with about four-in-ten expressing
opposition. (Interestingly, support is slightly higher among those who completed the online survey).
When presented with the two potential fee options for these roll carts, only about one-quarter say that either a one-time purchase fee option or an annual fee option are acceptable. Residents are slightly more likely to say the annual fee option ($75/year for a large cart, $50/year for a medium cart and $25/year for a small cart) is very acceptable compared to the one-time purchase price option.
Service Interaction and Communication
About one-in-five residents have contacted the Township within the past year about one of the 10 key service areas or assets evaluated in this survey. Of these, only slightly more than one-half expressed satisfaction with how their issue was addressed.
Two-thirds of residents say the Township does a good job of keeping them informed, with one-third indicating it does either a fair or poor job.
When asked to explain why they feel the Township does only a fair or poor job of keeping them informed, these residents are more likely to say they get relatively little information, that it comes from few sources (the Beacon, brochures, notices…) and that information is provided inconsistently or too late.

CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS

There is significant room to improve on satisfaction scores. This first-ever benchmarking survey conducted for the Township of St. Clair shows that while nearly nine-in-ten residents express some degree of satisfaction with the services provided to them by the Township, only one-in-three provide top marks for these efforts. For the Township, the key challenge over the next few years will be to increase residents’ degree of satisfaction with services, moving citizens from moderate scores (4 or 5 out of 6) to the highest possible mark.
One potential path to do this is to focus attention and increase awareness about how the Township collects and treats wastewater, as this is the strongest driver of overall satisfaction, yet has a low satisfaction score due to the high number of people unable to rate the Township’s ability to provide this service.
Making improvements to roadways is another method of increasing generic satisfaction with the Township, as this is a secondary driver of satisfaction, rates as citizens’ second-highest spending priority and is identified as the service most in need of improvement.
While the results clearly show that drinking water is residents’ top spending priority, this is also likely because this is viewed as a table stakes component of municipal service – not because there appears to be a fundamental issue with how this service is delivered. Overall, satisfaction with household drinking water is very high and it was not raised by residents as a problem to be solved.
When it comes to water, making investments in – and communicating about – wastewater treatment and stormwater management should help residents feel confident about how the Township manages water-related infrastructure.

CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS
Most residents are already satisfied with waste collection and may resist efforts to move to a new system. Overall, nearly nine-in-ten Township residents are satisfied with garbage and recycling collection, as this is a service that has higher-than-average levels of satisfaction and is also a significant contributor to residents’ overall satisfaction with the Township. Specific questions about a proposed automated cart system reveal only tepid support for this waste collection model in principle, as well as low acceptance to the proposed fee options being contemplated.
If the Township does move in this direction, it will need to clearly and effectively communicate a strong rationale for why this change is necessary, highlight how citizens will ultimately benefit from it and, if possible, demonstrate the value associated with these annual or one-time fees for bins.
Customer service and communication are key challenges to be addressed. Among those who contacted the Township about an issue in the past year, satisfaction with how their problem was addressed was quite low, with only three-in- ten giving the Township full marks for how their complaint was managed. Indeed, the results of the survey show those who contacted the Township about a problem subsequently offered lower marks than those who did not get in touch. The Township should consider examining how it can more effectively deal with residents’ concerns, as an effective approach to this should help increase satisfaction scores with these core services.
Similarly, fewer than one-in-five residents say the Township is doing an excellent job of communicating with them. Those who give the Township low marks for communication point out that not only do they have relatively few channels to obtain this information, but that what they do receive tends to be incomplete, inconsistent or not timely. The Township should explore how it can enhance its existing communications channels, including through social media (particularly Facebook).

METHODOLOGY

Probe Research was commissioned by St. Clair Township to conduct a random and representative telephone survey of adult residents. This survey is intended to measure citizens’ satisfaction with civic services and spending priorities.
A total of N=301 St. Clair Township residents aged 18 and over were interviewed by telephone between and July 9th and 19th, 2020. Telephone sample was derived from randomly-generated landline numbers, as well as from the Township’s customer service records.
With a sample of 301, one can say with 95 per cent certainty that the results are within +/- 5.6 percentage points of what they would have been if all adult residents of St. Clair Township had been interviewed. The margin-of-error is higher within each of the survey’s population sub-groups.
Quotas were set by gender and ward, with statistical weighting by age, gender and ward applied to ensure the final sample mirrors the known characteristics of the Township’s adult population (based on the 2016 Census).
The survey was designed by Probe Research in close consultation with representatives of the Township.
Totals in this report may not add up to exactly 100% due to rounding.
An online survey available for all St. Clair Township residents to complete was also accessible on the Township’s website between July 9th and 31st, 2020. A total of n=159 responses were received. Results from this online survey are included in selected places in this report. It is important to note the results of this survey are directional, as they are not statistically valid and
representative of the adult Township population. 8

Unweighted base (N=301) (N=200) (N=100)
Weighted base (N=301) (N=214) (N=87)
(%)
GENDER
Men 49 49 49
Women 51 51 51
AGE
40-59 years 36 36 36
60+ years 34 34 34
HOUSEHOLD INCOME
<$60K 29 26 34 $60K-$99K 27 31 17 $100K+ 44 43 49 NUMBER OF PEOPLE IN THE HOUSEHOLD 1 12 10 17 2 40 42 34 3+ 48 47 49 OVERALL CITIZEN IMPRESSIONS MOST IMPORTANT COMMUNITY CONCERNS 12% 15% Economic issues 12% 14% Flooding/high water levels 10% COVID-19 Roads/ road repair Cell/internet service Q1. “I would like to begin by having you tell me what you consider to be the most important issue or concern facing the Township of St. Clair today? And what other issues or concerns do you think are important for the Township today?”* 7% Municipal services (general) 5% Environment 6% Taxation 4% Parks/recreation Base: Township adults aged 18+ *Multiple mentions were accepted. Totals may exceed 100%. Items mentioned less frequently: health care (2%), traffic/speeding (2%), council/municipal government (2%), education (2%), bylaws/planning, land use (2%), other mentions (4%). Nothing/unsure: 30% 11 MOST IMPORTANT COMMUNITY CONCERNS: RESIDENT VOICES Q1. “I would like to begin by having you tell me what you consider to be the most important issue or concern facing the Township of St. Clair today? And what other issues or concerns do you think are important for the Township today?”* The following are examples of verbatim comments associated with each issue from residents that were provided in the telephone and online surveys: 15% Economic issues 14% Flooding/high water levels 12% COVID-19 12% Roads/ road repair Base: Township adults aged 18+ *Multiple mentions were accepted. Totals may exceed 100%. 10% Cell/internet service 12 WARD 2 RESIDENTS MORE LIKELY TO BE CONCERNED ABOUT FLOODING, TELECOM SERVICES VARIATIONS BY WARD Q1. “I would like to begin by having you tell me what you consider to be the most important issue or concern facing the Township of St. Clair today? And what other issues or concerns do you think are important for the Township today?”* Ward 1 (n=200) Ward 2 (n=101) Economic issues Flooding/high water levels Roads/road repair Internet/cellular service Municipal services Taxes Environment/climate change Parks/recreation Other Nothing/unsure 33% Base: Township adults aged 18+ *Multiple mentions were accepted. Totals may exceed 100%. Other notable variations included: Those aged 40-59 are more likely to be concerned about flooding and high water levels (19% vs. 8% among those 60+). Those from higher-income households are more likely to be concerned about road repair (24% among those earning <$100K+ vs. 1% among those earning $60K- $99K). 13 CORE SERVICES/ASSETS ASSESSMENT 14 NEARLY NINE-IN- TEN SATISFIED WITH TOWNSHIP SERVICES Satisfied: 87% % from online survey: 78% 37% 33% Dissatisfied: 11% Q2. “Overall, how satisfied are you with the programs and services provided to you by the Township of St. Clair? Let’s use a scale from 1 to 6 where a 1 means you are very dissatisfied and a 6 means you are very satisfied..” 17% 8% 3% 2% Base: Township adults aged 18+ Satisfaction with the Township’s programs and services is consistent across both wards (89% in Ward 2 and 86% in Ward 1). Satisfaction is slightly higher among older residents (90% among those aged 60+) and those with mid-level household incomes (97% among those earning $60K-$100K vs. 77% among those earning $60K). 15 RESIDENTS MOST SATISFIED Very satisfied (6) Somewhat satisfied (4-5) Dissatisfied (1-3) (Unsure) % satisfied Online WITH DRINKING WATER, WASTE COLLECTION Household drinking water Garbage/recycling collection Snow removal 52% 40% 30% 37% 49% 55% 6%5% 10% 13% 89% 89% 85% 93% 83% 82% Q3. “Now I would like you to tell me how satisfied you are with each of the following services and public assets in the Township. Let’s use the same 1-6 scale where a 1 means you are very dissatisfied and a 6 means you are very satisfied.“ Base: Township adults aged 18+ Results of 2% or less not labelled. Traffic lights/road signage Street lighting Street/road maintenance Drainage/stormwater Sidewalks / walking trails Bridge maintenance Collecting/treating wastewater 40% 37% 27% 29% 31% 45% 43% 52% 47% 39% 12%3% 13% 20% 8% 9% 85% 80% 79% 76% 70% 87% 84% 79% 70% 74% 16 WARD 1 RESIDENTS MORE SATISFIED WITH WASTE COLLECTION VARIATIONS BY WARD Q3. “Now I would like you to tell me how satisfied you are with each of the following services and public assets in the Township. Let’s use the same 1-6 scale where a 1 means you are very dissatisfied and a 6 means you are very satisfied.“ Ward 1 (n=200) Ward 2 (n=101) Household drinking water Garbage/recycling collection Traffic lights/road signage Snow removal Street lighting Drainage/stormwater Street/road maintenance Sidewalks/walking trails Bridge maintenance Collecting/treating wastewater 90% 88% 92% 83% 85% 86% 85% 84% 82% 75% 81% 74% 78% 81% 80% 75% 72% 83% 69% 75% Base: Township adults aged 18+ Results of 2% or less not labelled. Other notable variations included: Younger adults aged 40 or younger are more likely to have lower satisfaction scores on most services, particularly treating wastewater (58% satisfied, with 31% unsure). Generally, those who have not contacted the Township about a particular issue are more likely to be satisfied with these services than those who have done so in the past year. 17 A driver analysis (or regression) measures the statistical relationship between two or more variables. This driver analysis measures the relationship between overall satisfaction with Township programs and services (Q2, which is the dependent variable) and satisfaction with specific programs/services (Q3, which are the independent variables). This driver analysis shows that, of the 10 programs and services measured, only the three shown below have a statistically significant effect (at the 95% confidence level) on overall satisfaction. The variable that has the strongest impact on overall satisfaction are collecting and treating wastewater (beta score of 0.326), with street and road maintenance (0.201) and garbage and recycling collection (0.154) having slightly lower beta scores, making them secondary drivers of satisfaction. Primary driver Collecting/treating wastewater, 0.326 Street/road maintenance, 0.201 Garbage/ recycling collection, 0.154 18 Using the correlation scores generated by the driver analysis, we can identify the derived importance of each of these variables and plot these scores against stated satisfaction for each of these 10 programs and services. The advantages of using this approach (as opposed to asking residents to state how important each of these services are) are that it provides a greater degree of actual variation in importance scores, and it makes answering questions less onerous and repetitive for the respondent. The chart on the following page visually depicts the relative importance and satisfaction of each of these program areas. It is important to note that these scores are relative to one another, with the average scores delineating the four quadrants into which these program/service areas fall. Items appearing further to the right on the chart are programs/services that residents are more satisfied with, while items that appear higher on the chart are higher in derived importance. (Note: unsure and not applicable responses were removed from the satisfaction scores). The quadrant analysis also shows the three drivers of overall satisfaction shown on the previous page, with the primary driver marked in blue and the secondary drivers shown in yellow. Critical Deficits (High derived importance, low satisfaction) Programs/services that require attention in order to improve overall satisfaction with Township services/assets. Diminished Opportunities (Low derived importance, low satisfaction) Programs/services that are less critical to improve as a means of increasing overall satisfaction. Critical Assets (High satisfaction, high derived importance) Areas of strength for the Township for which it will seek to maintain high levels of satisfaction. Diminished Assets (Low derived importance, high satisfaction) Programs/services that citizens appreciate but that have a less critical influence on how satisfied citizen are with the Township’s services. 19 TOWNSHIP SERVICES QUADRANT ANALYSIS Critical Deficits Critical Assets *Based on correlation scores (ranging rom .581 to .376) that have been converted to a percentage Diminished Opportunities Satisfaction (81% Average) Diminished Assets 20 ONE-QUARTER WANT TO SEE IMPROVEMENTS TO LOCAL ROADS Total Unaided Mentions Q4. “Which specific Township services, if any, would you say are most in need of improvement at this time? Any others?”* Water quality Other Nothing/unsure 40% Base: Township adults aged 18+ *Multiple mentions were accepted. Totals may exceed 100%. Residents of Ward 2 are more likely to mention parks/recreation (17% vs. 8% among those living in Ward 1), flooding/high water levels (11% vs. 2% respectively) and internet/cellular service (11% vs. 1%). Women are more likely to mention recycling and garbage services (14% vs. 2% among men). Those with three or more children in the household (17%) and those aged 40-59 (19%) are more likely to advocate for improvements to parks and recreation services. 21 TAXES AND MUNICIPAL SPENDING PRIORITIES NEARLY THREE- QUARTERS INDICATE THEY RECEIVE AT LEAST GOOD VALUE FOR THEIR TAX DOLLARS Q5. “Thinking about all of the services you receive from the Township of St. Clair, how much value would you say you receive for the tax dollars that you pay towards these services? Would you say the value you receive is…?” Base: Township adults aged 18+ Excellent/Good: 73% Fair/Poor: 24% % from online survey: 65% % from online survey: 33% 50% Excellent Good Fair Poor (Unsure) Perceived value for tax dollars is relatively consistent across wards (75% of those in Ward 1 and 70% of those in Ward 2 say they receive excellent or good value for their taxes. Older residents are most likely to say they received high value for their taxes (81% among those 60+ vs. 67% among those 40-59). Those who are more likely to be satisfied with Township services are most likely to say they received good or excellent value for their taxes. RESIDENTS ARE SPLIT ON APPROACH TO SETTING TAX RATES AND SERVICE LEVELS Maintain taxes at same level/ decrease service levels slightly 40% (Unsure) 7% Decrease taxes/ cut services 5% Online: 3% Online: 23% Online: 13% Q6. “Which of the following options would you most like the Township to pursue to pay for programs and services?” Increase taxes slightly/ maintain services 42% Online: 50% Increase taxes/ enhance services 6% Online: 13% Base: Township adults aged 18+ Women (51% vs. 33% among men) and those aged 60+ (52% vs. 36% among those 40-59) are most likely to be in favour of increasing taxes slightly to maintain existing service levels. Those who have not contacted the Township about an issue in the past year are more likely than those who have done so to be in favour of freezing property tax rates and decreasing service levels slightly (44% vs. 28% respectively). There are no significant differences between residents of Wards 1 and 2 on this question. Residents were asked a series of trade-off questions in which they assessed the 10 services/assets highlighted in Question 3. This time, however, they were presented with a series of five items at a time and asked to identify which one in that set of five should be the Township’s highest spending priority and which one should be the lowest spending priority. This exercise (called MaxDiff) requires residents to make trade-offs and helps identify the relative importance of these 10 services/assets. Each respondent was presented with six sets of five items each, with each individual service/asset shown three times during this exercise. On the following page, we show the MaxDiff score for each of these 10 items. This score is calculated by taking the number of times the item was chosen as the highest priority and subtracting the number of times it was selected as the lowest priority. For ease of comprehension, this derived score was multiplied by 100 and placed along a scale ranging from a minimum of -100 and a maximum of +100. Highest spending priority Service/Asset Lowest spending priority Household drinking water Street/road maintenance Collecting and treating wastewater Garbage and recycling collection Draining and stormwater HOUSEHOLD DRINKING WATER IS RESIDENTS’ TOP SPENDING PRIORITY Q7. “For the next set of questions, I’m going to read you a few lists of Highest priority +60 Household drinking water (+53) Street/road maintenance (+23) Collecting/treating wastewater (+10) Garbage/recycling collection (+9) Drainage/stormwater (+5) Explanation Items with a higher score (darker blue markers) are higher spending priorities in comparison to others. Items with a lower score (gold markers) are lower spending priorities compared to others. Gaps between services/assets indicate the degree to which this service/asset is a priority (e.g. household drinking water is twice as likely to be a spending priority as five services that the Township of 0 St. Clair provides to residents. When I read each set of five services, I want you to tell me which one of the five items I read should be the highest spending priority for the Township, and which one should be the lowest spending priority.” Snow removal (0) Bridge maintenance (-19) Sidewalks/walking trails (-24) Street lighting (-27) Traffic lights/road signage (-31) street/road maintenance). Note that scores are not percentages or the percentage of respondents selecting a priority – scores illustrate how each service/asset relates to the other in terms of whether it is or is not a spending priority. -60 Lowest priority 26 WARD 2 RESIDENTS MORE LIKELY TO PRIORITIZE DRAINAGE, BRIDGE MAINTENANCE RESULTS BY WARD Q7. “For the next set of questions, I’m going to read you a few lists of five services that the Township of St. Clair provides to residents. When I read each set of five services, I want you to tell me which one of the five items I read should be the highest spending priority for the Township, and which one should be the lowest spending priority.” COMMUNICATION AND SERVICE INTERACTION ONE-HALF OF THOSE WHO CONTACTED THE TOWNSHIP ARE HAPPY WITH SERVICE Q8. “In the past 12 months, have you contacted someone from the Township with a specific concern about any of the programs or services that we have been discussing?” Base: Township adults aged 18+ Q9. “Why did you contact the Township?” Q10. “Thinking about the times within the last 12 months you have contacted the Township about a particular issue, how satisfied are you that your concern or concerns were dealt with effectively? Let’s use the same 1-6 scale again where a 1 means you are very dissatisfied and a 6 means you are very satisfied.” Base: Those who contacted the Township (n=56)* *Caution: Small base Incidence of contacting the Township about key services/assets in the past 12 months Satisfaction With How Issue Was Addressed Very satisfied (6) Somewhat satisfied (4-5) Dissatisfied (1-3) (Unsure) Satisfied: 56% % from online survey: 47% THE BEACON IS THE MAIN SOURCE OF INFORMATION ABOUT THE TOWNSHIP Q14. “On another topic now… where do you receive your information about the Township of St. Clair news, events, activities and programs?”* Base: Township adults aged 18+ *Multiple mentions were accepted. Totals may exceed 100%. 64% Older adults aged 60+ are more likely to obtain information from the Beacon (71% vs. 56% among those aged 18-39). Those under the age of 60, on the other hand, are more likely to turn to the Township website for information (34% among those 40-59 and 28% among those 18-39 vs. 9% among those 60+). Those with three or more people in the household (38%) and those with higher household incomes (37% among those earning $100K+) are more likely to turn to the local newspaper for information. Women (15% vs. 5% among men) and those with higher incomes (21% among those earning $100K+) are more likely to get information from Facebook. 30 TWO-THIRDS OF RESIDENTS SAY THE TOWNSHIP DOES A GOOD JOB OF KEEPING THEM INFORMED Q15. “Overall, would you say the Township of St. Clair does an excellent, good, fair or poor job of informing citizens about important issues?” Excellent/good job: 66% Fair/poor job: 33% % from online survey: 57% % from online survey: 43% 50% Excellent Good Fair Poor Unsure Base: Township adults aged 18+ Those who are most likely to say the Township does a good or excellent job of keeping citizens informed include: Those who live in Ward 1 (69% excellent or good vs. 60% among those in Ward 2). Older adults (77% among those 60+ vs. 59% among those 18-39). THOSE WHO WANT BETTER COMMUNICATION CITE LACK OF INFORMATION, FEW SOURCES Q16. “Why do you say the Township does a (fair/poor) job of informing citizens about important issues?” Don't get info/get very little info Relatively few sources Information is inconsistent/late Have to search for/find own sources 7% Rely on word of mouth 6% Information is incorrect/hard to understand 5% No response to emails/phone calls 3% No internet/newspaper/radio 2% Other mentions 4% (Unsure) 7% 23% 33% 29% Base: Those who say the Township does a fair/poor job (N=99)* *Caution: Small base size Examples of verbatim responses (from online survey): THE BEACON IS THE MAIN SOURCE OF INFORMATION ABOUT THE TOWNSHIP Q14. “On another topic now… where do you receive your information about the Township of St. Clair news, events, activities and programs?”* Base: Township adults aged 18+ *Multiple mentions were accepted. Totals may exceed 100%. 64% Older adults aged 60+ are more likely to obtain information from the Beacon (71% vs. 56% among those aged 18-39). Those under the age of 60, on the other hand, are more likely to turn to the Township website for information (34% among those 40-59 and 28% among those 18-39 vs. 9% among those 60+). Those with three or more people in the household (38%) and those with higher household incomes (37% among those earning $100K+) are more likely to turn to the local newspaper for information. Women (15% vs. 5% among men) and those with higher incomes (21% among those earning $100K+) are more likely to get information from Facebook. 33 WASTE COLLECTION SLIGHTLY MORE THAN ONE-HALF Strongly support Somewhat support Somewhat oppose Strongly oppose (Unsure) % % SUPPORT MOVING TO CART SYSTEM FOR WASTE, RECYCLING Q11. “The Township of St. Clair is considering changing how it collects garbage and recycling from households. Right now, garbage is collected in bags and recycling in blue boxes. Many communities in Ontario now use an automated collection system that involves using rolling carts. The collection truck drives up to the cart, a hydraulic arm lifts the cart and dumps the contents in the truck and then sets the cart down. In general, do you support or oppose the Township of St. Clair adopting an automated roll cart system for… (And is that strongly Collecting recycling Collecting garbage 26% 27% 26% 24% 17% 18% 23% 24% support 8% 52% (65% online) 7% 51% (61% online) oppose 40% (24% online) 41% (29% online) or somewhat?)” Base: Township adults aged 18+ Support for this proposed new system is higher among: Women (60% strongly/somewhat support for garbage and 58% support for recycling, vs. 43% and 46% support respectively among men). Those aged 40-59 (64% for recycling and 55% for garbage, compared to 47% and 45% among those 60+). The results in each ward are relatively similar. ONLY ONE- Very acceptable Somewhat acceptable Somewhat unacceptable QUARTER FIND FEE OPTIONS FOR CARTS TO BE ACCEPTABLE Very unacceptable (Unsure) Option 1: One-time purchase fee % acceptable % unaccept -able ($250/large cart, 5% 20% 16% 56% 4% 25% 72% $150/medium cart, (23% (72% $75/small cart) online) online) Q12. “How acceptable or unacceptable is it to you personally for the Township to charge homeowners a one-time purchase fee for these carts? The proposed fees would be $250 for a large cart, $150 for a medium-sized cart and $100 for a small cart. Is it…” Q13. “And if, instead, the Township charged an annual fee to homeowners of $75 for a large cart, $50 for a medium-sized cart and $25 for a small cart, how acceptable or unacceptable would this be to you personally?” Option 2: Annual fee ($75/large cart, $50/medium cart, $25/small cart) 25% (28% online) 71% (67% online) Base: Township adults aged 18+ Those aged 40-59 are slightly more likely to find the one-time purchase fee option to be acceptable (30% vs. 18% among those 18-39 and 24% among those 60+). There are no significant differences by ward for either pricing option.